LATEST ADDITIONS

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Michael Lavorgna Posted: Dec 23, 2015 25 comments
Our barn's overall interior dimensions are roughly 35' x 45' x 12'. My listening/work space is now 17' x 35'. These final dimensions were accomplished by moving well over 100 boxes and bins and various pieces of furniture out of the barn, and then once everything was rearranged, back in. It took a few days but it was well worth the effort. The barn sounds great, feels great, and I'm very fortunate to be able to call this home, for work and play.
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Michael Lavorgna Posted: Dec 22, 2015 20 comments
Schiit Audio is well-known among audiophiles as a company that delivers well-liked, well-loved?, products at affordable prices. Mike Moffat along with Jason Stoddard are the men behind Schiit, each having a long and storied hi-fi history. Mike Moffat generously agreed to take part in this Q&A, which I hope will give you a better understanding of the company's products and their attitude, which is anything but...
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Michael Lavorgna Posted: Dec 21, 2015 1 comments
I thought I will give this a go. Hopefully I can share a few albums that your readers will like. I sure love them.
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Michael Lavorgna Posted: Dec 18, 2015 0 comments
AudioStream's Greatest Bits 2015 represents every bit, bob, and bobble reviewed this year that has received our Greatest Bits award. I hope you enjoy this year's picks.
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Michael Lavorgna Posted: Dec 18, 2015 3 comments
Chris and Cosey have been pouring sonic tonic into amygdalae for decades. Add Nik Colk Void and we're off to the funhouse.
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Michael Lavorgna Posted: Dec 18, 2015 10 comments
Thanks to reader mtymous1 for the heads up on this free download of the Foo Fighters new EP Saint Cecilia. Get yours here.
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Michael Lavorgna Posted: Dec 17, 2015 3 comments
There's More Than One Way To Skin A DAC
PS Audio's new NuWave DSD DAC has taken some engineering cues from the company's much-loved DirectStream DAC (see review). While the NuWave does not house the same FPGA-based processing as found in its larger and more costly sibling, it does house a complex programmable logic device (CPLD), a device that sits between a programmable logic device (PAL) and a field programmable gate array (FPGA) in terms of complexity. The CPLD in the NuWave is tasked with one important job; take the incoming bits from the XMOS-based USB receiver and other digital inputs and pass it along to the 32-bit ESS Hyperstream DAC corrected; "discovers sample rate and format, reclocks all incoming data, reduces jitter, waveshapes data output to the DAC chip, and utilizes high speed/low gate count logic to reduce propagation delay for faster throughput". The CLPD accomplishes this in what the company calls "Native Mode" meaning there's no sample rate conversion employed. After the DAC, a passive filter is applied in the analog output stage.
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Michael Lavorgna Posted: Dec 16, 2015 19 comments
For me, the entire high-rez "debate" is of little interest. The fact of the matter is I own and enjoy high-res recordings so from that perspective, which is the one I value most, reading or listening to people going on about how they didn't hear a difference or how I can't hear a difference is irrelevant. From a purely theoretical basis, we've seen a number of tests and blog posts that "prove" high-rez audio is a waste of time and money, but when tests and blog posts don't match reality, I file those tests and blog posts under "A" for Agenda or "IF" for If It Was Only That Simple.
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Michael Lavorgna Posted: Dec 16, 2015 1 comments
Good News! Qobuz was put in receivership last month and given until November 16th to find an investor or shut down. That deadline was extended due to offers put on the table and things have shaken out to reveal two potential buyers with two real offers. The Commercial Court in Paris will make its final decision regarding these offers on December 29th, and if all goes well, Qobuz will come out alive and well. Here's Qobuz:
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Michael Lavorgna Posted: Dec 14, 2015 5 comments
Some recordings sound canned, the artifacts of production and the recording process call attention to themselves so it takes more work to listen to them. Some popular recordings are even produced in a way that they sound better in your car than on your home stereo (for an example of production that I think detracts, listen to Hozier's album compared to the live NPR mini concert). The Lovely Recordings I've selected, while not audiophile demos, have both musical content I love and sound quality that helps you get into the music. They all sound more real and let you hear further into the mix, especially with better playback systems. These aren't exactly obscure recordings but I feel they should be better known than they are. Doing this, I developed a new appreciation for those who write about music—it's hard.

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