LATEST ADDITIONS

Michael Lavorgna  |  Jul 17, 2017
[This is Joe's 4th Lovely Recordings! A big Thank You, Joe, Ed.]
Stephen Mejias  |  Jul 11, 2017
Cover art: Todd Steponick, Nice Looking Designs

Track 11

Pop songs are almost always playing in my mind. It's happening now as I write these words. It happens while I am reading, watching television, taking a shower, even in the middle of conversation. Sometimes the music is quiet, far in the background of my consciousness, while other times it is alarmingly loud, like daytime construction work on a Jersey City street.

Michael Lavorgna  |  Jul 10, 2017
As often happens when friends come to dinner, we ended the evening, glass in hand, listening to a couple of their favourite tracks, followed by a couple of mine. "So," she said, settling into the listening seat for her turn, "I guess this is the sweet spot in your happy place?"

"Exactly!" said my wife. "Exactly!"

She’s right. I have loved music—playing and listening—for as long as I remember. I’m not one of those stereophiles that buys new equipment more often than new music, but it has to be said that I have only once in my adult life owned a car that was worth more than my stereo. When it comes to transporting me to out of reach places, the stereo wins hands down.

Michael Lavorgna  |  Jul 07, 2017
Back in the '80s, Joe (Surdna) and I would make the shortish downhill trip from Bennington, VT to Williamstown, MA and Toonerville Trolley Records where we would discover new things.
Michael Lavorgna  |  Jul 06, 2017
All-in-One-System (AiOS)
The Cary Audio All-in-One-System joins the group of recently reviewed All-In-Ones; Moon by Simaudio Nēo Ace, Hegel Music Systems Röst, Lumin M1, and Peachtree Audio nova300 Amplifier. Let's see how well it fits in with such distinguished company.
Michael Lavorgna  |  Jul 05, 2017
It's that time again. Lovely Recordings has become an indispensable aspect of the AudioStream genome and I want (need?) to keep it going: Sharing music being one of the loveliest things we can do in this fine hobby.
Joe Surdna  |  Jul 04, 2017
A lot of ink has been spilled over what is and what is not punk rock. We know what historical punk is: Iggy, Sex Pistols, Wire, Flipper, but do we know what it is now or have we succumbed to the realm of conservative self-parody and stylistic boredom? The Dadaists were the first proto punks. The punk rock I want is a utopian ideal, while the punk I got is more dystopian. How does punk rock make me feel? Generally just annoyed—it’s an aural irritant. It’s rude, crass, dissonant, noisy and usually assumes a guise of nihilism. NY’s Show Me The Body is the closest Americans have come recently as well as this month’s selection North Carolina’s ISS.
Michael Lavorgna  |  Jul 03, 2017
David Hancock was the legendary engineer responsible for the famous 1967 Donald Johanos/Dallas Symphony Rachmaninoff Symphonic Dances LP, as well as Arturo Delmoni & Meg Bachman Vas’ Songs My Mother Taught Me. What many audiophiles don’t know is that David also was a Juilliard-trained classical pianist.
Michael Lavorgna  |  Jun 30, 2017
We were listening to my gold vinyl limited edition copy of The Heliocentrics A World Of Masks at a Monkeyhaus recently and I was thinking, "Damn. This is one fine record. I wish I had more records like this." That thought didn't stay in the forefront for long and I went about my day-to-days. Then, just the other day, I was rummaging around my digital music collection and tapped "Play Now" on Massive Attack's Mezzanine and within a few seconds thought, "Damn! Here's one."
Alex Halberstadt  |  Jun 28, 2017
"If it measures good and sounds bad—it’s bad. If it measures bad and sounds good, you’ve measured the wrong thing." —Daniel R. von Recklinghausen, Chief Engineer, H.H. Scott.

The main thing I’ve learned after an adulthood of listening to recorded music is that we still don’t really understand what makes it fun. What I mean is the factors that make music reproduction emotionally engaging (as opposed to accurate sounding) remain, to a significant extent, a mystery. This is especially true of digital. Which makes sense—the phonograph disk has been around since Emile Berliner introduced it in 1889. Digital encoding arrived nearly a century later, and after three-decades-and-change we’re still getting our heads around how to make it sound like music.

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