SimpliFi Audio

The Bladelius Embla sits center bottom

Tim G. Ryan of SimpliFi Audio had a lot to warm the cockles of the computer audio lover's hard drive including the Bladelius Embla CD Player/DAC/Preamp/Music Server (Standard $4,500, Basic $6,000 and Classic $9,000). I wrote about the touch-screen enabled Embla during my CES 2012 coverage but I'll repeat it here to save you the click. The Basic model includes five digital inputs (AES/EBU, RCA, Toslink, USB, Ethernet and optional Blutooth) all capable of accepting up to 32-bit/192kHz data. The Basic model adds a 32GB Solid State Drive so you can rip your music to SSD or play it from disc and the Classic adds a 64GB SSD drive and 3 analog inputs. You can load up your Embla with up to 2TB of Solid State Storage goodness (I did not get the price for this but figure—a lot).

The Bladelius Embla uses proprietary software for ripping "bit-perfect copies of CDs using our advanced proprietary data reading error-analysis algorithms enabled by a high-performance Teac drive" as well as for its media player interface which has an accompanying iPad app. All files are ripped to WAV format and the Embla will retrieve meta data from its internal library or through a number of online sources including freedb and Music Brainz as long as its connected to the internet via its Ethernet port. You can also access your UPnP devices and play back the music you have stored on network-attached hard drive or NAS or direct connect an external hard drive via USB. File formats supported include WAV, HRx, FLAC, MP3, WMA, and OGG.

Also on silent display was the Baledius USB DAC ($695) which I got such a nice photo of because I have one here (smile). The Baledius USB DAC is of the USB bus powered, asynchronous, galvanically isolated variety and can handle up to 24/192 data. I'll be telling you a lot more about the Baledius USB DAC shortly.

COMMENTS
zagarmike's picture

Dear Mr. Lavorgna,

I think that there is a mistake "The Basic model includes five digital inputs (AES/EBU, RCA, Toslink, USB, Ethernet and optional Blutooth) all capable of accepting up to 32-bit/192kHz data."

Bluetooth, probably mixed up with Blu - Ray

 

PS Thank you for running Audiostream.com. Very informative and easy to read.

 

Mike

Michael Lavorgna's picture

Verified on the Bladelius website.

PS - thanks!

stephhance001's picture

Perhaps the most significant challenge is how to deal with standing waves (also known as room ‘modes’) which appear at low frequencies in every listening room. When audio is played back in a typical room, bass output may get severely distorted. -Steven C. Wyer

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