Munich High End 2017: The Wrap

all photos from a walk around Munich

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that We talk about ourselves and complain, a lot.

I don't know about you, but I'm tired of all of the hi-fi talk about hi-fi. That includes industry talk about the industry, manufacturers bad-mouthing manufacturers, reviewers bad-mouthing reviewers, manufacturers bad-mouthing reviewers, reviewers bad-mouthing manufacturers, hi-fi hobbyists bad-mouthing manufacturers, manufacturers bad-mouthing hi-fi hobbyists, hi-fi hobbyists bad-mouthing reviewers, reviewers bad-mouthing hi-fi hobbyists, and so on.

See, I told ya.

Well, this wrap is going to be more than my usual wrap because I'm going to wrap up all of this micro-pond, i.e. a pond smaller than a small pond, silliness and send it assailing (wink). We the people interested in this hobby are so fortunate that good fortune doesn't even begin to describe our good fortune; We, the people, spend our time in the pursuit of the enjoyment of music. What, on Earth, is there to complain about?

The Munich High End show is my favorite hi-fi show because taken at large this truth is self evident; We, the people, spend our time in the pursuit of the enjoyment of music and this shit is really fun. And potentially soul-fulfilling as long as we keep our sights set on the experience and enjoyment of music (no, I'm not going to complain about the music). I find this easy to do as long as I don't get caught up in all of the self-referential L'Eggo my Ego-ing talk about us and it that turns this beautiful sea of possibilities into a scum-infested pond.

I view it as my job, nay my mission, to keep the focus on these truths —experience, enjoyment, fun, and music.

Cheers.


For more Munich High End 2017 show coverage, check out:

Michael Fremer's Analog Planet
My friend John Darko's Digital Audio Review

COMMENTS
monkeybrsin's picture

"The Law of Flexibility. This law involves a pragmatic acceptance of the present moment. We accept ourselves, others and current circumstances rather than a rigid resistance of the moment. It requires an alert and expansive state of awareness, and embracing and making constructive use of the moment. Stumbling blocks become stepping stones and problems become opportunities. Everything serves our highest good if we make good use of it. The serenity prayer used by Alcoholics Anonymous and other twelve step programs reflects this law. "God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference." This prayer was drawn from Buddha's writings.". (From: http://www.spirit-web.org/theosophy/the-universal-laws-and-conditions-of... )

"Wherever a spirit of narrow sectarianism predominates, the Movement ceases to be Theosophical, whatever else it may be. Wherever aloofness, suspicion, intolerance, and arrogant self-righteousness prevail, then and there the spirit of the Masters and of H.P. Blavatsky is replaced—probably in ignorance or in foolishness—by a “theosophical” modification of churchism, wherein the exclusiveness of a small coterie parades under the peacock-feathers of a vaunted superiority over others. This trend is definitely out of season and out of line in a world which, even apart from the Theosophical Movement, is attempting to build a global civilization to replace the smouldering wrecks of nationalistic nightmares."

..."But here lies the inherent danger of censorship: where does it stop, when an individual or individuals decide that they are right and everyone else who thinks differently wrong?" ......... "Once Theosophists start using the language of hate, then they have nothing new to offer the world, for they have degenerated into just another sect and set up hard-and-fast dogmas of their own.

No one is denying the right of individuals to critique this, that or any other thing, for as HPB says in Isis Unveiled: “It is not alone for the esoteric philosophy that we fight, nor any modern system of moral philosophy, but for the inalienable right of private judgment,” but this right must be extended to others with the realization that there are those who see things differently. This was the thing that made Theosophy unique in the history of religions and philosophies: the ability to hold different views and disagree and yet rise above such disagreement to work for a common goal. If the Mahatmas can write: “It is an every day occurrence to find students belonging to different schools of occult thought sitting side by side at the feet of the same Guru,” why can’t Theosophists try to emulate this? "
(From: Boris de Zirkoff in the Sept-Oct 1948 issue of his magazine, Theosophia http://blavatskynews.blogspot.com/2010/08/i-am-of-paul-and-i-of-apollos.... )

"Tolerance of other people, as also the unfavorable circumstances, can come from acceptance. When we decide to accept people as we find them, we get an opportunity to cultivate the virtue of Adaptability. In a subtle way our likes and dislikes work havoc, reminding us that we must learn to adjust with those we like , as also, those we do not like. We always want things to go our way. Resignation consists in understanding that Law rules in everything and every circumstance, and that nothing can come to us, whether good or evil, of which we are ourselves not the cause."

..."Bias means prejudice. But bias is also mental inclination or leaning, or one fixed way of looking at and understanding things. Even in everyday affairs it would be a good practice to endeavor to see things from another person’s view point. We not only need to listen, carefully and sympathetically, to another person, but if need be, get into another’s shoes. A well-balanced mind is practical, logical as well as mystical." (From the article: "In the Light of Theosophy – Tolerance and Intolerance" which originally appeared in the January 2016 issue of The Theosophical Movement https://www.theosophyforward.com/articles/theosophy/1697-in-the-light-of... )

grantray's picture

As much as I dig HPB, Ouspensky, and the Gurdj, it was Daumal's little essay, Pataphysics and the Revelation of Laughter, that really did for me. Later, I came across Chuang Tzu, who many times essentially said the same thing, but way better, of course. (Sorry, Rene!) Laughter, in the face of all, is the best medicine.

In a world of imperfect speaker crossovers, poorly chosen rectifiers for amplifiers, and drone strikes on small encampments with families in faraway lands, amazingly, the world still worlds. Unperturbed. Ha Ha.

:)

monkeybrsin's picture

"Running around accusing others is not as good as laughing. And enjoying a good laugh is not as good as going along with things." From: Zhuangzi. (1968). The Complete Works of Chuang Tzu
( http://www.pursuit-of-happiness.org/history-of-happiness/zhuangzi/ )

grantray's picture

Poor Confucius was definitely the serious type, eh? :)

I really dig Graham's translation of that passage: "You dream you are a bird and fly away in the sky, dream that you are a fish and plunge into the deep. There's no telling whether the man who speaks now is the waker or the dreamer. Rather than go towards what suits you, laugh; rather than acknowledge it with your laughter, shove it from you. Shove it from you and leave the transformations behind; then you will enter the oneness of the featureless sky."

Looking forward to what you create with the next big ape, and if she'll sing out with a horn.

kukur9's picture

Fitting visual theme, thanks.

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