Bel Canto e.One Stream arrives for review

When you you are hustling the halls of a hi-fi show, you often have to pick and choose your rooms carefully as far as timing goes, because from previous experience you know there are going to be certain rooms that you’ll want to linger in much longer than others.

Rooms that featured Bel Canto Design gear were always one of those that saw me wishing I had more time to spend. I’ve seriously enjoyed and been impressed by Bel Canto Design gear for a while now. Their e.One line first caught my ear a couple years back and was soon followed up with similar head bobbing to their Black and BlackEX model lines. So when Bel Canto’s Michael McCormick reached out to me to see if I would be interested in reviewing their freshest-of-the-fresh e.One Stream ($1,599 USD MSRP) I was ecstatic and within a couple weeks I had a production unit land on my doorstep.

Where to start? With so many options built in, Bel Canto has what appears to be another sleek, small form factor design to flesh out their already deep quiver of e.One models (DAC2.7, CD3t transport, C5i integrated amp, REF600M mono blocs and REF500S stereo amplifier) with this, their e.One Stream.

The new Bel Canto e.One Stream is a network streaming bridge that has a size, form factor and feature-rich slew of capabilities reminiscent of another network bridge I have on hand: the dCS Bridge, so I look forward to comparing the two.

The e.One is loaded with an Asynchronous-Ethernet input that gets passed along for output to your DAC or preamplifier as DSD or PCM via AESEBU, SPDIF or TOSLINK or unbalanced RCA (2V Line output) via its internal DAC architecture, which can not only handle 24bit/192kHz files, but is also MQA Core digital output/MQA full renderer Analog output-capable. It also sports an USB-A input for external drives or sticks (this makes me very happy) can be software/firmware updated remotely and last, but certainly not least, is a Roon Ready end-point (pending approval).

Controlling the e.One Stream is accomplished via the bespoke UPnP/DLNA Bel Canto SEEK iOS App which allows users to browse local network files (NAS or USB) and stream Tidal, Qobuz or Vtuner.

John Stronczer, founder and chief of design at Bel Canto says, “… critical to the e.One Stream’s musical performance is the asynchronous architecture and ultra-low phase noise clocks. This provides the highest level of isolation from the network and phase accuracy, producing virtually unmeasurable jitter and the most musically engaging experience.”

Look for a full review of the e.One Stream in the near future.

COMPANY INFO
Bel Canto Design Ltd.
221 North 1st Street, Suite 300 Minneapolis MN 55401 USA
info@belcantodesign.com
1-612-317-4550

COMMENTS
Luca's picture
Rafe Arnott's picture
Just wondering if you read the post, because I specifically say I'll be comparing it to the dCS Bridge...
Hudson's picture

Really interested in this streamer, as it fits nicely between the super cheap DIY stuff (Allo Signature) and the high end streamers (Aries, Aurender). I love that it is Roon ready, and love that it provides the full range of digital outputs to accommodate a wide variety of DACs. Plus, it looks nice. Hoping that they've done some neat stuff on the power supply to isolate noise.

I'm setting up a Roon system in my house, where one of my rooms will be a higher end headphone system with a vinyl setup and Tidal. Currently, using a highly modified Squeezebox with a premium power supply and a nice older Musical Fidelity TriVista DAC, and it's a pretty clunky navigation experience. I've looked at the Allo Signature, which seems interesting, the Bel Canto looks more interesting, and I'm having a hard time justifying the need to spend over $1600 for an endpoint that doesn't have a DAC, especially one that is not Roon compatible (sorry Aurender).

I'll be awaiting the review and very curious to see how this streamer performs against the DCS. It would be great if you could get access to an Allo signature for comparison.

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