High Res Audio

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
Michael Lavorgna Posted: Jun 29, 2016 41 comments
The AES has just published a peer-reviewed paper by Dr. Joshua D. Reiss titled "A Meta-Analysis of High Resolution Audio Perceptual Evaluation" which concludes:
"The overall conclusion is that the perceived fidelity of an audio recording and playback chain can be affected by operating beyond conventional levels."
In other words, yes, people can hear the difference with hi-res. My ears and brain and experience rejoice in this positive reinforcement!
Filed under
Michael Lavorgna Posted: May 25, 2016 43 comments
Carnival of Souls in high-res

In a manner of speaking, it should be. Now that The Industry is promoting the crap out of High-Res Music, with that godawful logo, you may as well throw a flower on it and call it a day.

Filed under
Michael Lavorgna Posted: May 12, 2016 12 comments
I was very tempted to reduce the size of this image to reduce its pain-inducing impact

First things first—who the hell designed that logo? If the message you want to convey about high-res music is that it's very old-fashioned, has little real money behind it, and it sounds kinda painful and spiky and stings like a bee, bravo, a job well done. I know that's harsh, so let me apologize to whomever RIAA member's son or daughter designed that logo.

From the press release dated May 11, 2016:

Filed under
Michael Lavorgna Posted: Mar 08, 2016 7 comments
Here's a list of some of the sites I frequent when looking to buy music downloads. Enjoy!
Michael Lavorgna Posted: Jan 15, 2016 5 comments
We all know we're going to die. Most of us just don't know when. For those that do, and for those who imagine they will, change from the everyday is the order of the day. David Bowie was a beautiful soul, there are lots of them, but he was also a luminous soul of which there are not so many. We are fortunate to bath in the light of such luminous souls.
Filed under
Michael Lavorgna Posted: Dec 29, 2015 0 comments
Earlier this month, Google announced 24-bit/96kHz support for its Chromecast Audio device (see report). Thanks to reader Chris L. for the heads up on this new news from Qobuz: Qobuz Sublime subscribers (219.99£/year) [footnote 1] will soon be able to stream their purchases, including up to 24/96 content, on Google's $35 Chromecast Audio device. A Sublime subscription also buys you "24-Bit Hi-Res downloading at MP3 prices. From 30% to 60% permanent reductions." on a large part of the Qobuz catalog.
Filed under
Michael Lavorgna Posted: Dec 16, 2015 19 comments
For me, the entire high-rez "debate" is of little interest. The fact of the matter is I own and enjoy high-res recordings so from that perspective, which is the one I value most, reading or listening to people going on about how they didn't hear a difference or how I can't hear a difference is irrelevant. From a purely theoretical basis, we've seen a number of tests and blog posts that "prove" high-rez audio is a waste of time and money, but when tests and blog posts don't match reality, I file those tests and blog posts under "A" for Agenda or "IF" for If It Was Only That Simple.
Filed under
Michael Lavorgna Posted: Dec 02, 2015 26 comments
What Hi-Fi? has reported that Tidal hi-res streaming using MQA is a done deal in their post "Tidal to launch hi-res audio streaming in 2016". AudioStream confirmed with Tidal's strategic partnership manager Pål Bråtelund that this is certainly the plan, and in the works, but the real deal is "not confirmed". Another part of the plan, and one I hope will come true (like a dream), is the new Tidal Hi-Res/MQA service won't cost you any more than the current Tidal HiFi price of $19.99/month. Yeow!
Michael Lavorgna Posted: Nov 27, 2015 0 comments
Whenever music reminds me of the Shangri-Las minus the innocence with the last few decades of music informing the sound, count me in. Meg Remy is the mind and voice behind U.S. Girls and Half Free is her latest album, out on 4AD. Half Free also reminds me of the Shangri-Las minus the innocence and Remy's voice and lyrics are beautifully spellbinding, more than bit sad, out in front of an expertly crafted and compelling amalgam of beats, rhythms, sounds, and drive.
Filed under
Michael Lavorgna Posted: Nov 24, 2015 1 comments
I'm a fan of MA Recordings' recordings as they combine a few of the things that I value and enjoy: a passion for discovery, a passion for music, and a passion for capturing those elements in a recording. Todd Garfinkle, MA's proprietor, travels the world in search of "provocatively creative musical statements", which he captures using two omni-directional microphones in acoustic settings. There's a reason why you'll hear MA Recordings from bands like Será una Noche at hi-fi shows but don't let that scare you. We're talking beautiful music recorded beautifully.
Michael Lavorgna Posted: Oct 19, 2015 13 comments
I have a confession to make; near the end of nearly every RMAF, some piece of music played on some system in some room chokes me up to the point of having to hold back tears. I would suggest my reaction has to do with everything including the music and its sound. Three year's ago, it was the "Violin Sonata in G Minor" composed by Claude Debussy as performed by David Abel, violin, and Julie Steinberg, piano, from a DSD transfer in the Wilson/VTL room (see details).
Michael Lavorgna Posted: Oct 16, 2015 1 comments
With her last album, Loud City Song (see review), Julia Holter seemed to have stepped up to a level of musical maturity. With her new release, Have You In My Wilderness on Domino, she seems to have been busy building new musical worlds.
Michael Lavorgna Posted: Aug 07, 2015 0 comments
Pop. Of course Ducktails' new record St. Catherine (Domino) isn't really pop in the sense that it'll be a streaming sensation, rather it's pop in the sense of song form. Ducktails' Matt Mondanile is from New Jersey, so I have a soft spot for his music, and he's been honing his Ducktails craft since 2006. And it shows.
Michael Lavorgna Posted: Jul 24, 2015 3 comments
Dawn of Midi's Dysnomia is the kind of music you actually have to listen to (eek!). I have my friend John DeVore to thank for the heads up on this Brooklyn-based band and it just figures. You see, John is just the kind of guy who actually listens to music (eek!). Albums' worth at a clip (eek!). I'm also an album listening lover which may be due to the fact that I grew up spinning records and I wanted to hear every last musical morsel on every record I bought. And I still do.
Michael Lavorgna Posted: Jun 26, 2015 2 comments
Unadventurous? That's how The Quietus' Christian Eede described Jamie xx's debut solo album In Colour (Young Turks). On the other hand, Pitchfork, Metacritic, Q, Consequence of Sound, and NME loved it. Hmm. This music reviewing thing seems to be simply comprised of subjective opinions! Therefore our best bet is to find reviewers whose tastes we share and then listen for ourselves. Hmm. This is the exact same advice I offer and follow for any review. Proof Poof!.