CD & LP Ripping Software Reviews

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Michael Lavorgna Posted: Dec 05, 2012 19 comments
Ripping Vinyl
Channel D's Pure Vinyl is software for ripping and listening to your records digitally. I don't know about you, but my LP-buying habits differ from my download-buying habits. The former is more varied and daring partly based on the fact that there's about one million times more LPs that interest me as compared to downloads. So my LP collection does not mirror my hard drive collection and sometimes, many times, I'd love to have access to my LPs from my computer. Channel D's Pure Vinyl to the rescue!
Michael Lavorgna Posted: Dec 14, 2011 1 comments
Channel D announces the release of Pure Vinyl 3.0 ($279, introductory price $229 till 1/16/2010):
The new Pure Vinyl 3, available now, represents a significant update including over two dozen new features and usability enhancements.

The update includes new peak level finder and speedy Preview Output Levels features for setting the optimum signal levels of edited output tracks; nondestructive, quality-preserving “surgical” pop and click removal; plus an extremely innovative feature using virtual iTunes "Bookmark Tracks" for creating playlists of tracks from LP recordings, without needing to save individual music tracks (the Bookmarks simply point to locations in the original high resolution recording).

Michael Lavorgna Posted: Nov 29, 2011 17 comments
dBpoweramp CD Ripper & Music Converter Reference R14 ($38 Windows-only) from Illustrate has added an "Uncompressed" option to its bag of FLAC encoding tricks with release 14.1. So what's the big deal?
FLAC encoder wording changed, also includes a FLAC Uncompressed encoding option (which stores audio uncompressed, for those who want WAVE PCM but with better ID Tagging).
Michael Fremer Posted: Aug 19, 2010 0 comments
As long as you're spinning an LP for your listening pleasure, and if digitizing it at a resolution of 24-bit/192kHz is transparent to the analog source, why not record and store the LP on your computer at that high sampling rate for future convenient playback via iTunes or for iPod use, or for burning to CD-R? And, while you're at it, why not record the LP unequalized and apply the RIAA curve in the digital domain, where you're not dependent on capacitors and resistors that are imprecise to begin with, and can drift over time? With no drift of phase or value, the virtual filter's results should be better than with any analog filter. And in the digital domain, you can program in any curve known, and select it at the click of a mouse. Aside from the sweat equity invested in programming it in the first place, it wouldn't add a penny to the program's cost.

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